Research Notes

Love Give Us One Death by Jeff P. Jones

This novel was born out of a desire to reanimate the speech of my ancestors.

Fiction

Food by Xenia Taiga

The family’s stomachs have been rumbling for hours. They stop at one elaborate, well-preserved, ivy-festooned Victorian house after another requesting to be let in, but the chefs only shake their heads as they fasten the place down, muttering about the storm.

Book Reviews

The Loved Ones by Sonya Chung

A multigenerational saga, Sonya Chung’s The Loved Ones follows two families living (mainly) in Washington D.C. from 1951 to the early 2000s. After a brief prologue, the story begins near the middle, in the ominous year of 1984.

Bookshelf

N by John A. Scott

On our bookshelf, editor Steve Himmer writes about John A. Scott’s Australian novel of authoritarian alternate history, N.

Research Notes

Leland Cheuk on Letters from Dinosaurs

It was the end of 2008 when I started writing short stories in earnest. The Great Recession had just begun, caused by the world’s largest banks playing with money it had loaned to people they knew couldn’t pay back. Bernie Madoff had just pled guilty to operating the largest Ponzi scheme in history, robbing thousands of their retirement savings.

Research Notes

Donna Miscolta on Hola and Goodbye

After my grandmother died, there was no one to make the tamales. My mother and aunts no longer had to bother their tongues with Spanish.

Fiction

When the robots arrived by Matt Rowan

The robots stood apart from us, some meters away, blandly surveying the unfolding scene with dull-glowing eyes. “Now comes time for the question of what do we do in the aftermath?”

Book Reviews

Staggerwing by Alice Kaltman

Alice Kaltman’s Staggerwing is best savored with a few bites of dark chocolate with chili pepper. It would complement the tone of the stories—bittersweet with a bit of a sting.

Research Notes

MB Caschetta on Pretend I'm Your Friend

It’s a very enjoyable experience to build and power a short story. You can look around and use just about everything you see, hear, and observe. With a novel, though, the author is rarely in charge; you have to play by the novel’s rules.

Fiction

Birds of the Air by Brandon Taylor

She wanted to ball up her fist and punch it through the glass, so she did. Why not? Who was there to stop her from throwing herself into something terrible?

Book Reviews

The Special Power of Restoring Lost Things by Courtney Elizabeth Mauk

The Special Power of Restoring Lost Things, Courtney Elizabeth Mauk’s third novel, spans little more than a day in the life of the Bauer family, minus one. It has been a year since their twenty-year-old daughter, Jennifer, left a night club in the Lower East Side of Manhattan on the arm of a stranger. She was never seen again.