Book Reviews

The Final Days of Great American Shopping by Gilbert Allen

The stories in Gilbert Allen’s The Final Days of Great American Shopping progress chronologically over a century, beginning in the early 1980s and ending in 2084, and although marketed as a short story collection, anyone could brand this a novel and be spot on.

Research Notes

Jeremy P. Bushnell on The Insides

My first novel, The Weirdness, was about the supernatural underbelly of the New York City literary world. As I approached the daunting prospect of beginning a follow-up novel, I knew I needed to strike out for new territory, to break new ground. But how?

Fiction

Degrees by Jennifer Fliss

63 degrees: It is spring. We are languishing on the hoods of our cars in the school parking lot, that’s otherwise empty because it’s a Saturday.

Book Reviews

HAH by Birgül Oğuz, tr Kenneth Dakan, Alexander Dawe, Mark Wyers, Alev Ersan, Arzu Akbatur, Abigail Bowman, Feyza Howell, Amy Spangler, and Kate Ferguson

HAH by the Turkish writer Birgül Oğuz is described as a short story collection that reads like a novel, but coming in at just over ninety pages, this novella of linked prose narratives defies conventional forms. The book won the 2014 European Union Prize for Literature and the translation from Turkish to English is a joint effort between nine translators.

Research Notes

Sequoia Nagamatsu on Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone

Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone is a collection of stories inspired by Japanese folklore and pop-culture, but I am a fourth generation Japanese American. So, where do these stories come from and what do they mean?

Fiction

Jerusalem by William Squirrell

Abraham Haglin came out west to save the Indians and the mountain men. He was a tall man, stooped, with a weak chin, and a nose wedged between his small eyes as hooked as a furrier’s knife. Munro hadn’t minded him so much. Not like some of the others.

Interviews

An Interview with Helen Phillips

Helen Phillips talks to Margaret Zamos-Monteith about her new collection Some Possible Solutions, writing, and doppelgängers.

Book Reviews

Over the Plain Houses by Julia Franks

With The Crucible back on Broadway, the TV series Salem slated for a third season, and Radiohead’s latest single, “Burn the Witch,” it seems we are in the season of the witch hunt. Add to this list Julia Franks’ debut novel Over the Plain Houses, in which Irenie Lambey, shirking her prescribed role as the subdued wife of a preacher, is subjected to painful scrutiny.

Research Notes

Martin Seay on The Mirror Thief

The Mirror Thief is set in three cities, all of which are versions of Venice, none of which I was able to visit during the years I was writing the book. Consequently I did a lot of research, of the fairly traditional sort.

Fiction

Galactagogues by Michelle Ross

The voices of the new mothers gathered in the lobby carry to the examination room, where Carla waits for the midwife. Accompanied by the cries of their infants, the mothers in the mom-and-baby group talk mostly about breastfeeding — the tingling, often painful, sensation of letdown; the nuances of their infants’ suckles; breast milk’s sweet, earthy odor.

Interviews

An Interview with Richard Hawley

Author Richard Hawley talks to Lynn Sloan about his latest novel, The Three Lives of Jonathan Force.